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Trichomoniasis symptoms & treatment | Avert - Avert.org / https://www.avert.org › Information on HIV › Sex & STIs › STIs Trichomoniasis symptoms & treatment | Avert - Avert.org / https://www.avert.org › Information on HIV › Sex & STIs › STIs
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Trichomoniasis symptoms & treatment | Avert Jump to navigation This site is best viewed with Javascript enabled. Please enable it in your browser settings. Google Tag Manager Global information and education on HIV and AIDS About HIV & AIDSWhat are HIV & AIDS? How HIV infects the body Symptoms Cure for AIDS Glossary I'm worried about HIV Transmission & preventionHow do you get HIV? Sex and HIV Injecting drugs Pregnancy, childbirth & breastfeeding Blood transfusions & transplants HIV myths Safer sex TestingWhy get tested? When to get tested? What’s involved? What happens after? HIV testing personal stories Living with HIVNewly diagnosed Sharing your diagnosis TreatmentStarting treatment What does undetectable mean? 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STIsChlamydia Genital herpes Genital warts Gonorrhoea Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Syphilis Trichomoniasis HPV Hepatitis A Pubic lice First time sex stories Sex & STIs personal stories Learn & shareFact sheets Quizzes HIV: The Basics HIV timeline Personal Stories Talking HIV Videos and graphics World AIDS Day 2019 News HubsGay health5 reasons to test for HIV (again) How to ask for what you want (in bed) Let's talk about sex Young Voices AfricaSex without a condom Unhealthy relationships Dating older people Options for contraception Talking about HIV How to say no How to use Young Voices Evaluating Young Voices Your comics You are hereHome » Information on HIV » Sex & STIs » STIs » Trichomoniasis Trichomoniasis symptoms & treatment FAST FACTS  Trichomoniasis is a tiny parasite found in the vagina and urethra (the tube that carries urine – pee – out of the body) or the head of the penis or prostate gland (a gland near the bladder that helps produce semen). It is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that can be passed on through sex without a condom or sharing sex toys with someone who has trichomoniasis (even if they don’t have symptoms). Trichomoniasis can be prevented by using male and female condoms, dental dams and latex gloves during sex. A simple examination and a swab or urine (pee) test carried out by a healthcare professional will show whether you have trichomoniasis. Trichomoniasis can be easily treated with antibiotics. If you’ve had unprotected sex, or you are worried about trichomoniasis or other STIs, get tested as soon as possible – even if you don’t have symptoms. What is trichomoniasis? Trichomoniasis, or trich (pronounced trick), is a caused by a tiny parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). How serious is trichomoniasis? It is easily treated and cured, but getting trichomoniasis while pregnant can cause low birth weight in newborn babies, if left untreated. How do you get trichomoniasis? Trichomoniasis is easily passed on and you can get it if you: have vaginal sex without a condom with someone who has trichomoniasis (even if they don’t have symptoms) share sex toys that aren't washed or covered with a new condom each time they are used  – although this is less common. Trichomoniasis isn’t passed on through oral or anal sex, kissing or hugging. Trichomoniasis, HIV and sexual health Having an STI, including trichomoniasis, increases your risk of getting HIV. If someone living with HIV also has trichomoniasis, their viral load will increase, which will make them more likely to pass on HIV if they have sex without a condom, even if they are taking HIV drugs (antiretrovirals). However, if someone has an undetectable viral load, there’s no evidence that trichomoniasis makes them more likely to pass on HIV. If you're taking antiretrovirals, it’s important to discuss with your doctor how treatment for trichomoniasis may interact with your HIV drugs. If you're worried about HIV, find out everything you need to know in our HIV Transmission and Prevention section. How do you prevent yourself and others from getting trichomoniasis? Use a new male or female condom or dental dam every time you have vaginal sex. The parasite can infect areas that are not covered by a condom – so be aware that condoms may not provide full protection. Cover sex toys with a new condom and wash them after use. Having multiple sexual partners can also increase your risk of getting trichomoniasis. If you are having sex with multiple partners, it’s even more important to use condoms and have regular STI tests. Discuss your sexual health with your partner. Knowing each other’s sexual health status can help you decide together how to have safer sex. If you know you have trichomoniasis, wait until you have finished your treatment before having sex again. Note condoms are the best form of protection against sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy. Taking PrEP doesn’t prevent trichomoniasis or pregnancy. Ask your healthcare professional for more advice. What do trichomoniasis symptoms look like? Many people with trichomoniasis don’t have any symptoms. If you do get symptoms, they normally appear within a month of infection. Symptoms for women include: yellow-green vaginal discharge which may have an unpleasant fishy smell soreness, swelling and itching in and around the vagina pain when passing urine (peeing) or having sex pain in the lower stomach. Symptoms for men include: thin, white discharge from the tip of the penis pain or a burning sensation when urinating (peeing) soreness, swelling and redness around the head of the penis and foreskin. Can I get tested for trichomoniasis? Yes – a healthcare professional can examine you and take a swab from the vagina or the penis. A urine sample can also be taken from a man. If you have trichomoniasis you should be tested for other STIs. It is important that you tell any recent sexual partners so they can also get tested and treated. Many people who have trichomoniasis do not notice anything wrong, and by telling them you can help to stop the parasite being passed on; and it can also stop you from getting trichomoniasis again. How is trichomoniasis treated? Trichomoniasis is easily treated with antibiotics. Make sure you take the treatment as prescribed and finish your course of antibiotics. Whether you have symptoms or not, don’t have sex again until you have finished your treatment, and if you can it’s a good idea to check back in with a healthcare professional before having sex again.   If you have had trichomoniasis and been treated you are not immune – this means you can still get infected again. Complications of trichomoniasis? As with most STIs, having trichomoniasis makes you more likely to get other STIs, including HIV. A pregnant woman with trichomoniasis can pass it on to her unborn baby, which can cause babies to be born prematurely or underweight. Without treatment, the infection can last for months or even years. HELP US HELP OTHERS Avert.org is helping to prevent the spread of HIV and improve sexual health by giving people trusted, up-to date information. We provide all this for FREE, but it takes time and money to keep Avert.org going. Can you support us and protect our future? Every contribution helps, no matter how small. PLEASE DONATE NOW Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Andrey Prokhorov   Last full review:  01 July 2018 Next full review:  30 June 2021 Sources:  NHS (2015) 'Trichomoniasis' CDC (2017) 'Trichomoniasis' Mayo Clinic (2018) ‘Trichomonas’ Last updated: 26 September 2019 Last full review: 01 July 2018 Next full review: 30 June 2021 Puberty Exploring your sexuality Am I ready for sex? 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Related links Chlamydia symptoms & treatment Gonorrhoea symptoms & treatment Genital warts symptoms & treatment Genital herpes symptoms & treatment Syphilis symptoms & treatment Subscribe to our mailing list * indicates required Email Address * First Name Last Name Newsletter options HIV news digest - updates on the latest HIV news Avert news - updates on Avert’s work, impact and fundraising Press releases Popular resources About AvertOur impactSupport usNewslettersYoung VoicesLearn and shareHIV timeline Contact us E: [email protected]Contact usTell your story Help us Help us empower people through knowledge and achieve a world that is free of HIV. Every £1 you donate to Avert, helps us achieve that vision. Donate Follow us Jobs Media Terms and conditions Creative Commons Privacy policy Sitemap Safeguarding policy All material on www.avert.org is copyright Avert (unless stated otherwise). All rights reserved. Registered UK charity number: 1074849. 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The backlash against sex education in the UK will ultimately harm ... / https://www.opendemocracy.net › backlash-against-sex-education-uk-will-... The backlash against sex education in the UK will ultimately harm ... / https://www.opendemocracy.net › backlash-against-sex-education-uk-will-...
https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/5050/backlash-against-sex-education-uk-will-ultimately-harm-childre
The backlash against sex education in the UK will ultimately harm children | openDemocracy Close Our work gets results. We hold power to account - sparking criminal investigations and exposing abuses. Help us do more. Make a donation Open Democracy Home Page Select language العربية English Español Português Русский Open menu Select language العربية English Español Português Русский All Themes Conflict & security Crime, justice & law Cultural politics Economics Environment Gender & sexuality Health & care Media & communications Migration Politics & activism Racism & xenophobia Religion & spirituality Projects 50.50 Beyond Trafficking and Slavery Can Europe Make It? 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Dark Money Investigations democraciaAbierta digitaLiberties Global Extremes North Africa, West Asia oDR openDemocracyUK openJustice ourEconomy ourNHS Rethinking Populism Shine A Light Transformation Regions Africa Central Asia China, East & SE Asia Europe India & South Asia Israel & Palestine Latin America Middle East & North Africa Oceania Russia Turkey United Kingdom United States & Canada About Submit Submit an article Search Search Donate Donate Close Close Please type and press enter Submit 50.50 The backlash against sex education in the UK will ultimately harm children A new British sex education curriculum has sparked outrage from religious parents. But where are the voices of young South Asian women in this debate? Ritu Mahendru 16 July 2019 Parents demonstrate against sex education curriculum in Birmingham, UK 2019. | Aaron Chown/PA Wire/PA Images. All rights reserved. Share this Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share via email Share link URL copied to clipboard Read more! Get our weekly email Enter your email address Submit I’ve done community work and research on sexual health issues in South Asia, and with the diaspora in the UK, for nearly two decades. On countless occassions, parents have told me they want to take their children out of sex education lessons, citing religious concerns. Last year, a Bengali woman in London told me these classes were “haram [forbidden by Islamic teaching] to our communities and we would want our children to opt out of this in school”.In February 2019, the Department for Education released new relationships and sex education (RSE) guidance for all UK schools, updating the curriculum for the first time in 20 years following a period of consultations with parents, teachers and religious groups. This new guidance which will come into effect in September 2020, covers education for primary as well as secondary school students, including general health education for all ages.Significantly, the new guidance is LGBTIQ inclusive; it teaches primary school students, for example, about the existence of LGBTIQ families. It obliges schools to increase the time they spend teaching students about menstrual health and informed consent, and also introduces new guidance on risks related to social media and the internet, for instance ‘sexting’ and ‘revenge porn’.Many educators have seen this as a much-awaited, progressive move. But there’s also been a fierce backlash from some parent groups which, on grounds of religion, argue that sex education should not be a mandatory part of the school curriculum. In particular, they’ve called for the scrapping of lessons that reference LGBTIQ relationships. At least five schools have suspended these classes already.Protests began earlier this year at Parkfield community school in Birmingham, in England’s West Midlands region. There, teacher Andrew Moffat came under fire for disclosing his sexuality to his students and designing a ‘No Outsiders’ programme to promote diversity. Such protests then spread to other schools in Birmingham as well as in other cities including Manchester. “What has frustrated me the most ... is the complete neglect of South Asian voices in this debate, especially young women’s voices.” In Birmingham, 32-year-old Shakeel Afsar, whose daughter attends an Islamic school, has taken centre stage in these demonstrations. Recently, she stood outside the city’s Anderton Park school with a megaphone declaring "Our kids, our choice". (Last month, a court order banned people, specifically protesters like Afsar, from demonstrating in an ‘exclusion zone’ around the school).Ultimately, the new RSE strategy still allows parents to withdraw their children from sex education but they will have to seek the headteacher’s permission, which can be denied. Under the new guidance children can opt into sex education themselves, starting three terms before their 16th birthday. This is important: in my experience, headteachers often defer to parents (but there is still the risk of being caught for those students who opt-in on their own).What has frustrated me the most, including before the government published its new guidelines, is the complete neglect of young South Asian voices in this debate, especially young women’s voices. They are forced into the role of passive subjects. The media, politicians, teachers, parents and religious institutions have failed to let girls speak up about their desires and needs. LGBT+ Muslim campaigners Saima Razzaq and Khakan Qureshi with activists in Birmingham, May 2019. | Katja Ogrin/EMPICS Entertainment. All rights reserved. In the past few years, I've led research projects on sex education and sexual health – working with Indian, Bengali and Afghan communities all across London. Some of these results will be published later this year. Repeatedly, I found that young people lacked basic information about their bodies and sex. Often, they’d been absent from sex education lessons at school, and from wider debates on these topics.Some of the young women I interviewed described getting pregnant because, as one explained, they “didn’t know how to say no to unprotected sex”. I also heard about cases of sexual abuse by close family or community members. “My first sexual experience was with my uncle”, a 19-year-old British Indian woman told me. “I completely froze and didn’t know what to do”.This abuse happened while her mother was away in India, she continued. She chose not to speak out about this because she feared it would cause divisions in her family. She explained: “My family can get quite rowdy. He has a very good reputation in the community and was extremely religious”. Women also described how missing sex education lessons impacted other parts of their lives.A young Bengali woman in Tower Hamlets, in east London, told me: “I think wearing heals could affect the size of my vagina and I might lose my virginity. Also, I don’t think my bits look normal”. An 18-year-old Afghan woman said “I didn’t know women could cum”, explaining: “my mum withdrew me and my sister from RSE lessons. I didn’t know about it [the female orgasm]”.Another young British Indian woman told me her mother found out she was pregnant, at 16, because her doctor was also Indian and knew her family. “It happens in our school as well. Everyone knows everyone”, she added.She wouldn’t trust her school, especially as it’s located in a diaspora community, to keep attendance of sex education lessons in strict confidence. In such contexts, how can we expect teenagers to independently ‘opt-in’ to these classes? Do they really have the freedom of choice?‘Assault on the family’It’s not just Muslim parents protesting the new RSE guidance. A conservative Christian secondary school assistant, Kirstie Higgs, recently lost her job after posting an online petition against LGBTIQ issues being taught at her son’s primary school in Manchester. (She is now taking legal action for unfair dismissal, represented by lawyers at the Christian Legal Centre).The new guidance has also been criticised by some journalists like Simon Jenkins and politicians like MP Roger Godsiff. Education secretary Damian Hinds said “what is taught, and how, is ultimately a decision for the school”. The founder of a campaign against RSE, Katherine Sarah Godfrey-Faussett, called it “an assault on the family” and “a war on morality and on our spirituality”.But the real assault is on the young South Asian girls who face the physical and psychosocial consequences of early sexual relationships; who get sexually abused, including within their own families and communities; and who are let down by the teachers, health professionals and governments that have failed to provide them with the adequate information they need to negotiate safe sex.Many of the South Asian teenage girls I’ve spoken to, including for my recent research, remain unaware of basic information and risks related to their own bodies. I felt it was crucial to quote some of these young women directly – in order to hear their voices, which otherwise have been so effectively silenced.When the media and politicians prioritise the voices of religious parents and groups who seek to control their children, especially girls, we fail these children. Nigel Farage, Tommy Robinson and other British far right characters have meanwhile used debates around sexual conservativism in Muslim communities to claim that all Muslims are ‘backwards’.We must give young South Asian women the platform instead. Sex education must be taught from primary school to tackle child sexual abuse and other sensitive issues that put girls in vulnerable situations. Left unchecked, the backlash against sex education in the UK will ultimately harm children. Who do you think should be the next Labour Leader?Sir Keir StarmerRebecca Long BaileyLisa NandyJess PhillipsEmily ThornberryClive Lewis Expose the ‘dark money’ bankrolling our politics US Christian ‘fundamentalists’, some linked to Donald Trump and Steve Bannon, have poured at least $50m of ‘dark money’ into Europe over the past decade – boosting the far right.That's just the tip of the iceberg: we've got many more leads to chase down. Find out more and support our work here. Donate Share this Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share via email Share link URL copied to clipboard Read more Published in: 50.50 Apply for a 2020 data journalism fellowship focused on women’s and LGBTIQ rights Written by: Lydia Namubiru All articles by: Lydia Namubiru Written by: Claire Provost All articles by: Claire Provost Published in: 50.50 Apply for a 2020 investigative journalism fellowship focused on sexual and reproductive health Written by: Kerry Cullinan All articles by: Kerry Cullinan Published in: 50.50 I’ve defended hundreds of LGBTI people arrested in Uganda. Our laws must change – but we need public acceptance too Written by: Patricia Kimera All articles by: Patricia Kimera Published in: 50.50 Help us tell the stories of global feminist resistance Written by: Nandini Archer All articles by: Nandini Archer View all in 50.50 Get 50.50 emails Gender and social justice, in your inbox. Sign up to receive openDemocracy 50.50's monthly email newsletter. Enter your email address → Comments We encourage anyone to comment, please consult the oD commenting guidelines if you have any questions. Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. Related Tracking the backlash sex education Gender & sexuality India & South Asia United Kingdom This article is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International licence. If you have any queries about republishing please contact us. Please check individual images for licensing details. All our projects openDemocracy Facebook openDemocracy Twitter openDemocracy Youtube © openDemocracy 2020 About People Contact Write for us Jobs Privacy notice Log in Audio available Bookmark Check Language Close Comments Download Facebook Link Email Newsletter Newsletter Play Print Share Twitter Youtube Search Instagram


Getting HIV infection - vaginal sex, anal sex - HIVFacts - HIVFacts.org / https://hivfacts.org › hiv-children Getting HIV infection - vaginal sex, anal sex - HIVFacts - HIVFacts.org / https://hivfacts.org › hiv-children
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